U.S. Forest Service awards contract for two water scoopers

Aero-Flite will supply two CL-415 air tankers for one to five years.

Aero-Flite air tanker T-260, CL-415,

Above: Aero-Flite’s Tanker 260, a CL-415, at McClellan Air Field, March 23, 2016. Photo by Bill Gabbert.

The daily availability rate for the two Aero-Flite CL-415 air tankers will be $42,285 with an hourly rate of $13,299. That daily rate is higher than all of the 21 large air tankers on contract. And only two large air tankers have a higher hourly rate — one of the DC-10s and the USFS/Coast Guard C-130.

The maximum five-year value of the contract is $142,524,440 for the two aircraft.

It is our understanding that the contract used last year expired. This new solicitation specified that the USFS would hire “up to two” aircraft for a period of time “not to exceed five years”. Obviously the agency made a decision and settled on two scoopers. We checked with Jennifer Jones, a spokesperson for the U.S. Forest Service, who told us that it is definitely a five-year contract.

One Aero-Flite CL-415 was on USFS contract in 2015, Tanker 260 (N389AC). The two this year are N386AC and N392AC. We don’t yet have their tanker numbers.

In past years the Bureau of Indian Affairs contracted for one or two twin engine water scoopers, CL-215s I believe, but no longer. This year they will have at least one amphibious water-scooping Single Engine Air Tanker (SEAT), an Air Tractor 802F (N6159F) supplied by Aero Spray, and expect to add one more, Robyn Broyles, spokesperson for the BIA, told us earlier this month.

There will also be a large number of non-water-scooping SEATs, perhaps dozens, on exclusive use. The Bureau of Land Management is responsible for that contract and we hope to hear in April or May how that turned out.

We updated the 2016 tanker list originally published March 2, 2016

The twin engine CL-415 can carry up to 1,600 gallons of water, refilling the tank by skimming along the surface of a lake as water enters the scoop that is lowered from the belly of the aircraft.

tanker 260 scoop
The scoop on the bottom of Tanker 260 used to fill the tank as the aircraft skims along the surface of a lake. Photo by Bill Gabbert.

 

Air Tankers at Dryden
Air Tankers, mostly water scoopers, at Dryden (Ontario) Regional Airport in June, 2015 before they were dispersed around the province of Ontario, Canada to deal with the rising number of wildfires. Photo by Chris Sherwin.