Drone detects spot fire while other aircraft grounded

It occurred on a wildfire in Southern Oregon during very smoky conditions

The Department of the Interior has been proactive and innovative recently regarding the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems, or drones, in land management. And they don’t hesitate to push out information about how they are using the small remote controlled helicopters and fixed wing aircraft.

In January the Department released a large, fancy, colorful infographic extolling the virtues of the drone program. They reported that 312 unmanned aircraft managed by the Office of Aviation Services supports everything from fighting wildfires to monitoring dams and mapping wildlife. In 2017, 200 certified DOI UAS pilots flew 4,976 flights in 32 states. The largest category of flights, 39 percent, was for training and proficiency, with 30 percent used for mapping and 14 percent for interagency fire management.

Now another large, fancy, colorful infographic (1.1 MB) is touting how a drone detected a spot fire across a fireline. It happened during very smoky conditions last year in Oregon:

“August 2017, two of the Alaska Type 1 Incident Management Team’s remote pilots flew a drone in support of a burnout operation on the Umpqua North Fire Complex in Southern Oregon. The burnout was conducted as a necessary means to restrict the fires encroachment towards a five mile stretch of highway 138, where the Toketee Dam power plant, houses, and the USFS Toketee Ranger Station were located. The values at risk were estimated to be worth in excess of $50 million. Smoke limited visibility to 100 feet and grounded all manned aircraft. The drone used was a small battery powered quadcopter fixed with an IR [infrared] camera providing a live video feed to firefighting personnel.

“The flight’s objective was to provide situational awareness for the division supervisor during the burnout operation” the infographic says. “A secondary objective was to monitor an active section of the fire, which was sending airborne firebrands behind the established control line. During the operation, a spot fire was discovered utilizing the IR [infrared] camera feed. The location was established, division supervisor notified and several resources dispatched to contain it before it got out of control.”

drone wildfire detection
A portion of the DOI’s latest drone infographic.

According to the DOI, drones:drone cost

  • “Limits exposure and reduces risk to pilots and wildland firefighters.
  • Able to fly when manned aircraft are not able.
  • Limits cost – Each 3DR Solo drone costs $1,800. The IR sensor package costs $6,000. Other costs are the wages for the operator. If that mission was flown with a contracted light helicopter: AStar 350 B3 costs $3,480.00 for daily availability and $1,500 per flight hour.
  • Easily packable and able to fly in remote locations.”

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