Air tanker slides off runway at Manning, Alberta

The crew of two was transported to a hospital for evaluation.

(UPDATED at 8:59 a.m. MDT, May 7, 2016)

The Whistler Question reports that the pilot of the air tanker that slid off the runway at Manning, Alberta “suffered a medical episode” and the co-pilot was forced to land the plane. This occurred while the aircraft was approaching to land.

Below is an excerpt from the article:

…During the emergency landing at the airport strip, the plane veered off the runway and came to rest in the ditch, luckily without catching fire.

The co-pilot was not injured and walked away from the crash, but the pilot suffered a cut to the head, though he was conscious and breathing when first responders arrived.

His injuries are not considered life-threatening.

Global News had a similar report.

****

(Originally published at 9:42 p.m. MDT May 5, 2016)

Above: Alberta premier Rachel Notley confirms the air tanker incident at Manning.

An air tanker slid off the runway Thursday at the Manning, Alberta airport. There were no fatalities but the two pilots were being evaluated at a hospital. The air tanker had been working a fire near Manning before the incident.

T 45 at Manning Alberta
An air tanker at Manning Alberta slid off the runway on Thursday. CTV news photo.

CBC news quoted Eleanor Miclette, the acting chief administrative officer for the County of Northern Lights, who said the air crew lost control of the plane’s steering and crash-landed at the end of the runway around 4 p.m. The aircraft, a Convair, leaked fuel following the crash but there was no fire.

The position of the aircraft in the photo above is similar to that in the 2010 off-runway excursion of Neptune’s Tanker 44, a P2V, when a hydraulic failure upon landing led to inadequate brakes. The position is reminiscent of Minden’s Tanker 48 in 2014 that had a hydraulic failure causing the nose wheel to collapse while landing.

Tanker 45 at JEFFCO
Conair’s Tanker 45 at JEFFCO airport near Denver, June 2012 during the High Park Fire. In the Canadian aircraft registry, it is listed as a Convair 340-32 manufactured in 1953. Photo by Shane Harvey.

US Marine aircraft training for wildland firefighting

Click on one of the photos below twice to enable a larger format slide show.

On February 12 we wrote about CAL FIRE evaluating the MV-22 Osprey for dropping water on fires.

Video of Tanker 944, a 747, at Colorado Springs

On May 4, 2016 Air Tanker 944, a 747-400, made a dry run over the Colorado Springs airport and then conducted a practice drop with water. We were there to shoot this video and the still photos.

More information about the event.

(UPDATE May 5: the Colorado Springs Airport tweeted this video of the aircraft dropping today.)

And there’s this:

And here is a bonus video at no additional charge. Just after the 747 began taxiing before take off, three F-18’s landed. They taxied pretty close to where I was standing. A little military aircraft porn.

747 makes practice drop at Colorado Springs

(UPDATED at 12:08 p.m. MDT, May 4, 2016)

The practice drop by the 747 Supertanker occurred as planned this morning. After takeoff from the Colorado Springs Airport the aircraft followed a very detailed route specified by the FAA and made one dry run. After that it circled around and made a water drop between a runway and a taxiway. The FAA restricted them to half a load, only allowing them to drop about 9,800 gallons.

747 SuperTanker

747 SuperTanker

****

(Originally published at 10:21 a.m. MDT, May 4, 2016)

The 747 SuperTanker will be making a dry, low pass and after that a practice water drop at the Colorado Springs airport Wednesday morning, approximately between 10:45 and noon.

Tanker 944 747,
Tanker 944, a 747, at the Colorado Springs Airport Wednesday May 4 2016

Do pilots use the quadratic formula?

Quadratic formulaWe received this question from a high school student in Florida:

…Recently, my Algebra 2 teacher assigned a project to see if men and women in important professions use algebra in real life applications. In our math book it claims that, “Firefighting pilots can use the Quadratic Formula to estimate when to release water on a fire.” My question to you is do you really use the Quadratic Formula to put out a forest fire? If not, how do you do it? Thank you very much for any help you are able to provide and have a great day!

Let’s hear from some pilots.

  1. When you’re dropping water or retardant do you silently solve the quadratic equation in your head? If not, how do you determine when to release the load?
  2. Are there any occasions in your day to day work activities when you use algebra?

In case you want to brush up on the quadratic formula: Wikipedia.

MAFFS training begins in California

(Updated at 7:49 p.m. MDT, May 3, 2016)

The 146th Airlift Wing posted this video today — slow motion footage of a water drop.

****

(Originally published at 7:02 a.m. MDT, May 3, 2016)

Modular Airborne FireFighting System (MAFFS) aircraft and personnel from four bases are gathering this week for their annual training. They are being hosted by the Channel Islands Air National Guard Station in Ventura County, California, the 146th Airlift Wing. Each base can mobilize two C-130 aircraft with the slip-in fire retardant system. Usually they will send a third C-130 on each deployment with additional equipment and personnel.

Last week the Channel Islands unit tested their MAFFS.

We will update this post during the week as more information becomes available.