Video of Tanker 489 dropping on a fire in B.C.

The video shows multiple retardant drops by Air Spray’s Tanker 489, a Lockheed Electra, on a fire in Kokanee Creek Provincial Park in British Columbia (map).

Here is the description provided by the videographer:

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“Published on 4 Jul 2015
Fire season has arrived in the Kootenays! This video was taken July 3rd, 2015 showing the new small forest fire near Kokanee Creek Provincial Park towards Kokanee Glacier. This video features many of the aircraft involved in battling the blaze including water bombers, air tankers and helicopters with bambi buckets.

–The aircraft featured in this video include:
–Air Spray Lockheed L-188 Electra Airtanker
–Air Spray Twin Commander 690 Birddog C-FZRQ
–Cessna Caravan Birddog
–Selkirk Mountain Helicopters Aerospatiale AS 350 B-2 C-GSKL with water bucket
–Air Spray Air Tractor 802 Fire Boss Amphibious Tanker Plane

This was my first time ever seeing aircraft fighting a wildfire in person and it was truly an impressive sight. It was especially cool seeing the massive Electra turboprop diving down into the valley near Kokanee Creek Park and dumping fire retardant onto the flames.”

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BONUS VIDEO

This video of an MD-87 dropping on a fire in Laguna Canyon in southern California on July 3, 2015 is shot from pretty far away but you can clearly see the retardant and after the drop, the air tanker as it exits the area closer to the camera. It looked like an excellent drop. I could not make out the tanker number.

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BONUS VIDEO #2, added July 9, 2015

I found this video today, and it looks like the same air tanker, the MD-87, making another drop on the fire in Laguna Canyon. It’s interesting how at 0:48 it disappears into a canyon while making the drop.

CWN contracts awarded for 22 next-gen air tankers

Coulson T-132 grid test
Coulson Aviation’s L-382G during the grid test in early May, 2015.

The U.S. Forest Service announced yesterday that they awarded Call When Needed (CWN) contracts to five companies for a total of 22 next-generation air tankers. Not all of the aircraft exist yet in flyable, modified, inspected, and carded form. In fact, we estimate only about half of them are ready to go now if the phone rang.

The companies receiving the six-year CWN contracts include:

  • Neptune Aviation, 6 BAe-146s
  • Coulson Aviation, 1 Lockheed L-382G
  • Air Spray USA, 4 BAe-146s
  • 10 Tanker Air Carrier, 5 DC-10s
  • Aero Flite, 6 BAe Avro 146 RJ85s

These CWN contracts are in addition to the 14 air tankers currently on Exclusive Use Contracts, and the additional aircraft that could be added, up to seven, when the bidding process that is being protested now is settled. Later this year there could be up to 21 air tankers on exclusive use contracts, plus the CWN aircraft on this contract that was just awarded. Many of the air tankers currently on exclusive use contracts are also listed on the new CWN contract, so there is some duplication.

An exclusive use contract commits an aircraft to working non-stop, except for days off, for an extended period of days, 160, for example.

However on a CWN contract the aircraft may never be used by the USFS. It could sit for years without being activated by the agency. That was one reason the 747 “Supertanker” ceased to exist. It was parked for years on a CWN contract and was not used.

This, of course, can be a very expensive and risky proposition for a private company. They have to decide if they are going to maintain the aircraft in a continuous airworthy condition and hire flight crews and maintenance personnel. The USFS thinks it’s a great deal since they spend nothing if an air tanker is not used. But even if a CWN aircraft had been at one time fully certified, by the time the USFS decides to activate it, the aircraft and the staff to operate it may or may not be ready to fight fire. And the CWN rates are usually much higher than a multi-year exclusive use contract.

Walt Darren, a legendary air tanker pilot who passed away a couple of years ago, suggested that CWN aircraft could be paid a stipend during the fire season even when they are not being used. This would make it a little more palatable for a company to keep an air tanker ready to go.

Ravi Saip, the General Manager and Director of Maintenance for Air Spray at Chico, California, said none of their BAe-146s are fully operational today. They are working on two of them, and hope to have one finished by the end of this fire season. He said most of the work is done on that aircraft, and they are working closely with British Aerospace on the cutouts in the belly through which the retardant will flow. In about two months they hope to begin flight tests, and they still need to get the FAA’s Supplemental Type Certificate and the Interagency AirTanker Board certifications.

Rick Hatton of 10 Tanker told us they have three completed DC-10s. Two are carded and are being used today on fires in California, T-911 and T-912. The third, which replaced and upgraded the older T-910, will retain that tanker number and is waiting for the USFS to issue their certification.

Britt Coulson of Coulson Aviation said they hope their recently converted Lockheed L-382G will be carded by the USFS next week. A civilian version of the C-130, it completed the grid test in early May.

The full list of air tankers receiving CWN contracts is below. Click on the image to see a larger version.

Continue reading “CWN contracts awarded for 22 next-gen air tankers”

Air Spray — the largest tenant at Red Deer Airport

Air Spray executives
Ravi Saip and Paul Lane, in front of one of their Electras at Chico, California, on March 21, 2014. The aircraft is under a CWN contract with CAL FIRE. Photo by Bill Gabbert.

The Red Deer County web site has an article about Air Spray — an air tanker company that has bases in Alberta at Red Deer and at Chico in northern California. Below is the beginning of the article.

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“Red Deer Airport – Alberta’s Air Spray Makes Its International Mark

The largest tenant at Red Deer Airport, Air Spray is making an international difference for its work in fire suppression across Canada and in the United States. Despite the importance of their role, however, its specialized nature means the company’s work – and its astounding growth – often pass unremarked on in the general community.

Since the mid-1970s, Air Spray has operated out of Red Deer Airport; its original business of fire suppression has evolved into specialized pilot training and developing new aircraft for fire suppression. These business lines ensure steady growth for the company throughout Canada and into the USA, but the Edmonton-based company runs all their aviation operations from their Red Deer Airport location.

“Air Spray is primarily a forest fire suppression company – during the fire season, we work throughout Alberta, BC, the Northwest Territories, the Yukon and California,” says Paul Lane, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer for Air Spray…”

Air Spray acquires two SEATs

Air Spray has received a new Single Engine Air Tanker (SEAT) and will be getting a second one in a few weeks. The Air Tractor 802 holds 800 gallons of fire retardant and can get into narrow canyons that are more of a challenge for the larger 3,000 to 4,000 gallon “next generation” air tankers.

Air Spray has a contract for one of them with the State of Oregon and will be seeking employment for the other one.

Air Spray mobile retardant base
Air Spray mobile retardant base. Photo by Air Spray.

They have a mobile retardant base installed on a large trailer which will be heading to Oregon with the AT 802.

Air Spray mobile retardant trailer
Air Spray mobile retardant base. Photo by Air Spray.

Their effort to convert two BAe-146 jet-powered airliners into air tankers is going slower than they expected. When we visited their project at the Chico, California airport in March and talked with Ravi Saip (Director of Maintenance/General Manager) and Paul Lane (Vice President and Chief Financial Officer) they said they hoped to have most of the work done by the end of the summer, then they would begin the testing, tweaking, improving, and certification phases. In an article in the Chico ER, Mr. Saip was quoted as saying they now expect one of the BAe-146s to be ready for the 2015 fire season, and “They took longer to modify than we expected”. Other air tanker companies converting BAe-146s have found that much of the aircraft’s infrastructure in the belly has to be worked around and/or relocated in order to install an internal tank and door system as they are doing.

Air Spray executives
Ravi Saip and Paul Lane of Air Spray, March 21, 2014, in front of one of their Lockheed Electras at Chico, California, which is under a CWN contract with CAL FIRE. It will be in Chico again beginning in August, 2014. Photo by Bill Gabbert.

Another air tanker company moves out of California

 

Coulson's T-131 at Reno
Coulson’s Tanker 131 at Reno, April 18, 2014. Photo by Ryan Coulter.

The Coulson Group has moved their air tanker operation from McClellan Air Force Base in Sacramento, California to Reno-Tahoe International Airport in Nevada. This is the second air tanker operator that has moved out of the state in the last six months. In October, 10 Tanker Air Carrier relocated their corporate headquarters from Victorville, California to the airport at Albuquerque, New Mexico. 10 Tanker has two DC-10 air tankers and is converting a third, while Coulson has one C-130 on U.S. Forest Service contract and hopes to acquire another. Coulson expects to have a minimum of 20 employees on their payroll at Reno.

Still left in California is Air Spray, who in 2012 took over a hanger at Chico formerly occupied by Aero Union. The company has a  Call When Needed contract from CAL FIRE for an L-188 Electra “Long Liner” air tanker and is converting two BAe-146s into air tankers at the facility. Several employees that formerly worked for Aero Union are now employed by Air Spray at Chico.

 

KTVN Channel 2 – Reno Tahoe News Weather, Video –
Thanks and a hat tip go out to Britt, Ryan, Dave, and Scott.

Air Spray looks toward the end of the year for their BAe-146 tankers

Air Spray executives
Ravi Saip and Paul Lane, in front of one of their Electras at Chico, California, that is under a CWN contract with CAL FIRE.

The folks at Air Spray continue to work on the two BAe-146 aircraft that they are converting into air tankers. I found myself at the Chico, California airport yesterday and stopped by their hangar and talked with Ravi Saip (Director of Maintenance/General Manager) and Paul Lane (Vice President and Chief Financial Officer). The tanks they will install will employ some of the same principles as the gravity-based Aero Union RADS I tanks. They are being built now by Air Spray’s staff, which includes some former Aero Union employees. Mr. Saip also worked for Aero Union before they went out of business.

I looked inside one of the BAe-146s and observed some of the work that has been completed, including the gutting of the flight deck and the former passenger area. Before they install the tank in the interior they will cut a hole in the belly through which the retardant will exit.

They hope to have most of the work done by the end of the summer, then they will begin the testing, tweaking, improving, and certification phases.

They don’t have a contract for the BAe-146s, but are hopeful that they will find work for the air tankers after they are ready to fight fire.

“It’s not your average video game”

A reporter for Shaw TV in Red Deer, Alberta, Canada conducted two interviews with Perry Dancause, Director of Flight Operations for Air Spray about their air tanker business. The first one covers general information about the company and their operations at the Red Deer facility.

The second video is about their flight simulators. The reporter who looks like he is about 14 years old begins by saying “You know, it’s not your average video game”.

Air Spray has a fleet of Lockheed L-188 Electra turboprop air tankers and has established a US base at Chico, California. They are converting two BAe 146s into air tankers and in September received a Call When Needed contract from CAL FIRE for an L-188 Electra.