Inquest finds inadequate inspection contributed to fatal air tanker crash

A coroner’s inquest found that an inadequate inspection contributed to the crash of an air tanker in New South Wales, Australia.

Dromader M-18 air tanker
File photo of Dromader M-18. Photo by Ted Quackenbush.

David Black, 43, died when his M18 Dromader single engine air tanker crashed while fighting a fire at Wirritin in Budawang National Park, 40 kilometers west of Ulladulla, October 24, 2013 when a wing snapped off the aircraft as it was approaching the fire. The crash started another bushfire which, along with high winds, hampered efforts to reach the pilot.

Below is an excerpt from an article at 9news:

[The aircraft] was tested and inspected just over two months earlier by two companies, Aviation NDT and Beal Aircraft Maintenance, but [Deputy State Coroner Derek] Lee said the work was inadequately done.

He wrote in his findings that testing by Aviation NDT used an unauthorised method and did not comply with the mandatory requirements of the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Further, the plane’s wings were not removed during a visual inspection by Beal Aircraft Maintenance, meaning that corrosion and cracking on one of the left wing’s attachment lugs was not detected.

By the time Mr Black crashed in October, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau found that cracking on the inner surface of the lug had reached a critical length of 10.4 millimetres and at least 32 secondary micro cracks were also identified.

The engineer behind the visual inspection, Donald Beal, told the inquest the manufacturer’s service bulletin did not mandate removal of the wings, so he didn’t see any need to remove them.

Mr Beal also said there was ambiguity about what visual inspections actually involved, Mr Lee recalled in his findings.

Thanks and a tip of the hat go out to Chris.
Typos or errors, report them HERE.

Retardant stops wildfire in New South Wales

Above: The Carwoola Fire in New South Wales, Australia. Photo by NSW Rural Fire Service.

The New South Wales Rural Fire Service sent out this Tweet February 17 (U.S. time):

NSW RFS Carwoola Fire

The photo at the top of this article is an enlargement of the one in the tweet. It is interesting to see how the fire in some areas apparently burned into the retardant and stopped. However when this photo was taken it may have been creeping through a gap in the retardant. But since the RFS wrote that the fire was effectively stopped, the aircraft probably continued working on the fire after this photo was taken.

Four large and very large air tankers from North America have been on contract in New South Wales and Victoria during their down under summer — two C-130’s, an RJ85, and a DC-10. Australia also has numerous helicopters and single engine air tankers.

The map below shows lightning strikes and fires in NSW.

Infrared video of DC-10 drop

The fire was just a few miles from the DC-10’s base at Richmond, northwest of Sydney, New South Wales.

This infrared video, shot from a New South Wales Rural Fire Service aircraft, shows a DC-10 air tanker dropping on a wildfire in Australia. In the normal video the aircraft disappears in the smoke, but after switching to IR it can be seen again. The water or retardant it drops shows up as black, much cooler than the fire which is white.

In addition to the drop, there is fascinating IR footage of thousands of burning embers being blown downwind. A spot fire can be easily seen thanks to the IR soon after it starts. It later grows very large.

Tanker 131, now known as Bomber 390, arrives in Australia

Above: Tanker 131 reunites with its sister aircraft, Tanker 132, in Avalon, Victoria. Coulson photo.

Coulson’s Tanker 131 arrived safely in Avalon, Victoria (map) on Sunday U.S. time after an uneventful flight. Its sister ship, Tanker 132, happened to be at Avalon when it landed.

The planned route for the C-130Q to Australia was for 27 flight hours, more than 7,000 miles, and four stops en route for fuel. When its 85-day contract with Emergency Management Victoria begins on December 15 the aircraft will be known as Bomber 390.

Tanker 132, a C-130H, has been in Australia since September 6, 2016. It just had its contract extended for another month and will continue to be based at Richmond RAAF base in New South Wales until mid-January. But like in the United States, the tankers are moved around as needed and shared between states.

Tanker 131
Tanker 131 stopped at Norfolk Island to refuel. Coulson photo.
tanker 131 route
The route Tanker 131 took from Phoenix, AZ to Avalon, Victoria. Coulson image.

Impressive DC-10 drop in Australia

One of the comments says this was shot on a fire in New South Wales, Australia.

If you look closely, you’ll see that the air tanker ties onto and extends a previous retardant drop. I’d love to see an AFTER photo, when the fire hits the retardant.

Video of air tankers working the Londonderry Fire in NSW

Take a look at a DC-10 and a C-130 dropping water and fire retardant on the Londonderry Fire in New South Wales.

UPDATE, Nov. 17, 2016: we found out that the DC-10 was dropping BlazeTamer on the fire, not plain water.

Tankers 910 and 132 respond to fires in New South Wales

Air Tanker 910, the DC-10 that arrived in Australia October 30, responded to a wildfire that was within sight of where it is based at the Royal Australian Air Force Base in Richmond (map), 40 miles west of Sydney, Australia. It is working on a contract with New South Wales during their summer bushfire season.

10 Tanker Air Carrier published the above photo on their Facebook page, with the caption:

This is a picture of our first fire in Australia this year. We were asked to fly two missions on the fire, taking a total of less than 30 minutes of flight time. We hear about fires right off the end of the runway all the time….but they don’t get much closer than this.

Below is a slow-motion video of T-910 dropping, posted on the Facebook page of the Wallacia Rural Fire Brigade November 4, 2016 (U.S. time).

The photo below was posted on Facebook by the Wallacia Rural Fire Brigade. Coulson’s Tanker 132, an L-382G, started its contract in New South Wales on September 6, 2016.

tanker 132
Tanker 132 drops on the Llandilo bushfire in Australia, November 4, 2016 (U.S. time) Photo by Wallacia Rural Fire Brigade.