Final flights for the P2V air tanker retirees

Seven of the air tankers will be on permanent public display

P2V air tanker 10 gate guard missoula airport
Tanker 10 is the Gate Guard at Missoula International Airport.

Now that Neptune Aviation’s fleet of P2Vs have retired from active firefighting, the aircraft destined for museums have all flown for the last time and arrived at their final resting places.

Kevin Condit, the Marketing Manager at Neptune, updated us on their locations, along with links to news stories with more information.

In addition to Tanker 10, the gate guard at Missoula Airport, here are the other locations, last flight dates, and links:

Tanker 05
Location: Glendive, Montana (Glendive Airport)
Final flight: August 6, 2018
KXGN
Ranger Review

Tanker 07
Location: Paso Robles, California (Estrella Warbird Museum)
Final Flight: August 8, 2018
Estrella Warbirds Museum
Paso Robles Press

Tanker 45
Location: Belleville, Michigan (Yankee Air Museum)
Final Flight: September 5, 2018
Yankee Air Museum

Tanker 43
Location: San Diego, California (San Diego Air & Space Museum)
Final Flight: September 7, 2018
San Diego Air and Space Museum

Tanker 06
Location: Klamath Falls, Oregon (Tanker 61 Memorial)
Final Flight: September 9, 2018
Herald News
Herald News, second article

Mr. Condit said T-14 and T-44 are tucked away at Neptune’s hangar in New Mexico. Optimistically they might fly one of them in 2019 at one or more airshows but no details have been worked out yet.

Neptune plans on rebuilding the P2V version of Tanker 12 (as opposed to the current BAe-146 version) for a static display at the National Museum of Forest Service History near the Missoula International Airport. The aircraft has not flown for years after having been relegated to “boneyard” status, stripped of parts to keep the others flying. It will be rebuilt and restored to be a part of the outdoor exhibit at the museum. The timing for the rebuild is 2019-2020.

The two P2Vs that will be at or near the Missoula Airport, T-10 and T-12, will be only about a mile apart, but Mr. Condit said neither was airworthy, and Neptune preferred to see them preserved rather than scrapped. In 2012 Neptune discovered a 24-inch crack in a wing spar and skin on T-10, causing the FAA to issue an Emergency Airworthiness Directive requiring all P2V airplanes to be inspected within 24 hours of receiving the directive.

2 thoughts on “Final flights for the P2V air tanker retirees”

  1. Tanker 07 did so much for us here in SE AZ. Throughout the years she has seen a many fires here and saved many properties. It is hard to believe we are now in the jet age of aerial firefighting. Thank you for all those that did, and to those that will do.

    Sincerely,
    CCFnI
    Retiree of State of AZ Firefighters ’82-’07
    Structure, AirCrash-Rescue, Wildland, Instructor-Trainer

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