Photos of air tankers at Medford supporting the Milepost 97 Fire

Tanker 62 at Medford, Oregon
Tanker 62 at Medford, Oregon July 27, 2019. Photo by Tim Crippin.

Tim Crippin got these excellent shots of air tankers that were at Medford, Oregon July 27, 2019 supporting the Milepost 97 Fire south of Canyonville. Thanks Tim! The fire has burned 12,578 acres since it started on July 24, 2019.

Tanker 95 at Medford, Oregon
Tanker 95 at Medford, Oregon July 27, 2019. Photo by Tim Crippin.
Tanker 88 at Medford, Oregon
Tanker 88 at Medford, Oregon July 27, 2019. Photo by Tim Crippin.
Tanker 134 at Medford, Oregon
Tanker 134 at Medford, Oregon July 27, 2019. Photo by Tim Crippin.

7 thoughts on “Photos of air tankers at Medford supporting the Milepost 97 Fire”

  1. Really enjoy this site. It has allowed its followers to witness the transformation of aerial fire fighting from the beginning to the present.
    My father, and his brother flew
    Aerial tankers (B26,A26,PB4Y-2) in the 1960s through early 1970s. Thank you!

  2. I really enjoy your website, and I flew for Aeroflite out of Cody, WY in the early 1970 on Tanker B 30, a B-17. It’s nice to see all the information you provide on the fire fighting and air tanker business

    1. Malcolm,
      Did you happen to fly on a fire next to Cherry Lake, near the western perimeter of Yosemite National Park, in ’73 or ’74? I was on a ground crew cutting line on top of a ridge while a B-17 was making drops on the ridge below us. It was a thrill I’ll never forget. I can still ‘feel’ those engines 45 years later.
      I believe the plane’s fuselage wasn’t painted but that it had a red tail. I would love to know what number it was, if you could possibly help me out.
      That fire was 17,000 acres and was the biggest fire I fought in the two years I was on a CDF hand crew.
      Thanks a million. You too, Bill.

        1. It’s funny, I have seen that picture before and when I saw it I thought it looked like a reverse image of the B-17 that was flying at Cherry Lake. Almost the exact same view we had as he was making drops directly out from us on the ridge below where we were. I’d guess he was maybe 4-500 yards away, which I think was why the sound of those engines made such a mighty impression on a 22 year old kid.
          We were the first hand crew on that fire (we were based out of Angels Camp) and spent 37 hours on that first shift on 2 quarts of water. My partner ended up going via ambulance to the hospital in Sonora with a severe case of dehydration. It was all quite an adventure.
          I also found a photo of Tanker 56
          https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2245/1767483449_7597b94177_z.jpg
          at Grass Valley (where I’ve lived since ’74) and was blown away that the B-17s could fly out of there with it’s short runway.
          Thanks again, Bill.

  3. The Coulson and Cal Fire tankers were loading out of Medford that day supporting 2 fires on Hwy 96 along the Klamath River, the Tree and the Community Fires. I was driving to Happy Camp that day and watched excellent drops from both tankers (and 2 additional S-2 ‘s from the Redding tanker base) on the Tree Fire. The Milepost 97 was well into extended attack at that point and I would be very surprised to see the Cal Fire tankers working that far up into Oregon. Thought readers might like to know about the good saves that day along the Klamath.

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