In-cockpit video of air tanker drop on Boone Draw Fire

Jim Watson shot this video from the cockpit of Air Tanker 850, a single engine air tanker, as it made a retardant drop on the Boone Draw Fire in the northwest corner of Colorado, September 14, 2018.

Thanks Jim!

Convection columns and cracked air tanker windshields

Here is an excerpt from an article published this morning at Wildfire Today about the Delta Fire north of Redding, California.


“…There was no overnight mapping by a fixed wing aircraft Thursday night. One of the two U.S. Forest Service infrared scanning planes was down with mechanical difficulties, which could be the reason for the “unable to fill”. It was smoky over the fire during the night but that usually does not prevent imaging the fire, unlike clouds which prevent the infrared light from reaching the sensor on the aircraft. The ability to “see” through smoke is one of the primary attributes of infrared sensing technology. However an intense convection column containing smoke, ash, and burning embers can be confused with heat on the ground.

“During the large vegetation fires in southern California in 2003 some of the convection columns were so powerful that the windshields on six air tankers were cracked by chunks of debris that were being hurled into the air (page D-6 in 2003 California Governor’s Blue Ribbon Report; huge 20 Mb file). One pilot saw a four by eight sheet of plywood sail past at 1,500 feet.”


Do any of our readers who are pilots have similar experiences?

Firefighting pilot honored in memorial service in Australia

Pilot Allan Tull, known as “Tully” to the Australian helicopter community was posthumously awarded the NSW Rural Fire Service Commissioner’s Commendation for Service during a memorial service held in New South Wales, Australia August 23.

Allan James Tull helicopter pilot
NSW RFS photo

(This article first appeared at Collective Magazine)

Allan James Tull, known as “Tully” to his friends and colleagues, lost his life doing what he loved on August 18th while fighting the Kingiman fire outside of Ulludulla in western New South Wales when his firefighting helicopter struck a tree.

The memorial service was held at Bankstown Airport near Sydney at the hangar of Sydney Helicopters, the owner of the BK-117 contracted to the New South Wales Rural Fire Service. The award given posthumously to Mr. Tull was presented to family members by New South Wales Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons.

Allan James Tull helicopter pilot
NSW RFS photo

The award citation stated:

“Allan James Tull known as ‘Tully’ to his friends and colleagues, was born in New Zealand in April 1961. With a passion and love for flying Allan Tull was first introduced to the skies in 1988 when gaining a student pilot’s license. Further refining and learning Allan Tull was later awarded his Commercial Helicopter Pilots License in late 1998.

“Since gaining his pilot’s license, Allan Tull has logged over numerous decades thousands of flying hours across a broad range of industries including firefighting, mining, hunting and fishing in New Zealand, Australia, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, Inner Mongolia, China, United States, Canada and Guam.

“On Friday 17 August 2018, whilst flying a BK117 Helicopter for Sydney Helicopters, Allan Tull was tasked to water bomb the Kingiman Fire within the Shoalhaven Local Government Area. A task that Allan had done so many times for so many communities across New South Wales. Flight crews played a critical role in containing the Kingiman fire enabling ground crews to consolidate containment lines. During this water bombing operation an unfortunate event occurred that resulted in Allan tragically losing his life while protecting communities.

“The New South Wales Rural Fire Service offers to the family and friends of Allan Tull our deepest condolences. Allan Tull or “Tully” will always be remembered as an accomplished pilot and member of the firefighting fraternity for his professionalism and courage which will never be forgotten.”

Allan James Tull helicopter pilot
NSW RFS photo
Allan James Tull helicopter pilot
NSW RFS photo

Mr. Tull’s funeral service will be held in his native New Zealand Friday August 31 at 11 a.m. at the Tauranga Sport Fishing Club. All are welcome.

CAL FIRE hopes to get the seven HC-130H’s the Forest Service turned down

Above: Tanker 116, an HC-130H, on final approach at Fresno, July 22, 2017. Photo by L.S. Braun.

(Originally published at 2 p.m. PDT July 267, 2018)

Now that the U.S. Forest Service has decided that they do not want the seven HC-130H aircraft that were in the process of being transferred from the Coast Guard to the Forest Service, the door has opened for Plan B for those aircraft.

This story began in 2013 when Congress passed the National Defense Authorization Act directing that the Coast Guard transfer the planes and that the Air Force would arrange to take care the backlog of maintenance and the work needed to turn them into air tankers, appropriating up to $130 million to complete the work. At least two of the planes were close to completion with the exception of installing a retardant delivery system. Tankers 116 and 118 have been seen occasionally working on fires using a borrowed Modular Airborne FireFighting System in lieu of a permanent tank.

CAL FIRE has been considering the long range plans for their fixed wing fleet for a while. The 1,200-gallon S2T’s are not getting any younger and in recent years the agency has been supplementing those 23 air tankers with large and very large air tankers on a call when needed and exclusive use basis. At various times CAL FIRE has used BAe-146’s, DC-10’s, the 747 Supertanker and other tankers, all holding from 3,000 to 19,200 gallons. CAL FIRE was an innovator, being the first to contract for the Very Large DC-10 and 747 air tankers.

CAL FIRE Chief Ken Pimlott announced in an email July 26 that the agency is hoping to obtain the seven HC-130H’s:

…Senator Feinstein and her staff have worked tirelessly to seek amendments to the National Defense Authorization Act that authorize the transfer of the seven C-130H air frames to the State of California. This amended language will be voted on by Congress in the next week.

If approved, there are a number of steps which must take place before California, and ultimately CAL FIRE, can take possession of these aircraft. Additionally, they must be developed into firefighting air tankers, which will require funding through future budget processes. The number of aircraft to be built and the ultimate base locations have yet to be determined, and may take several years to implement. However, the acquisition of these aircraft are an important step forward in bolstering our capacity to address the State’s wildfire risk.

The U.S. House and the Senate are considering different versions of the National Defense Authorization Act referred to by Chief Pimlott. The conference committee charged with modifying and merging the versions agreed to require the Air Force to complete the conversions of the seven aircraft and give them to the state of California.

Here is what they came up with, in Congress-speak:

The House bill contained a provision (sec. 1075) that would amend section 1098 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66) to relieve the Air Force from the mandate to modify United States Coast Guard (USCG) HC-130H aircraft with firefighting capabilities for use by the United States Forest Service (USFS). The Senate amendment contained no similar provision. The Senate recedes with an amendment that would maintain the mandate for the Air Force to modify the USCG HC-130H aircraft, but designate the state of California as the ultimate recipient of the aircraft, vice the USFS.

The amended bill still has to be voted on and approved by the Senate and the House and then signed by the President, which could happen as soon as next week.

Air tankers at Medford fighting the Klamathon Fire

Above: T-93 departs Medford, Oregon for the Klamathon Fire in California. All photos by Tim Crippin July 5, 2018.

Tim Crippin took these photos July 5 of eight air tankers that were fighting the Klamathon Fire and reloading at Medford, Oregon.

As of Friday morning the fire just across the state line in California had burned approximately 8,000 acres and multiple structures. A civilian who has not yet been identified died in the fire.

air tanker Medford Klamthon Fire
T-914
air tanker Medford Klamthon Fire
T-164

Continue reading “Air tankers at Medford fighting the Klamathon Fire”

Video from Air Tanker 850 over the Horse Park Fire

Above:  Screenshot from video shot by Jim Watson, Pilot of T-850 GB Aerial Applications, over the Horse Park Fire.

Jim Watson, pilot of the GB Aerial Applications single engine air tanker T-850, shot this video while flying over and dropping retardant on the Horse Park Fire in southwest Colorado May 28, 2018. He was working with Lead 28.

Thanks Jim!

On May 27, the day before this drop by T-850, the fire was exhibiting extreme fire behavior and forced firefighters to withdraw to a safety zone. On that same day during initial attack a command vehicle was abandoned and is thought to be a total loss, according to information in a 24-Hour Preliminary Report. The driver was turning around when the vehicle got stuck. Due to the advancing fire, the driver and passenger had to flee on foot. There were no reports of injuries.

CAL FIRE Super Huey on the Moffat Fire

The Moffat Fire burned 1,265 acres north of Lone Pine, California Thursday April 19, 2018.

Video from MAFFS cockpit

These in-cockpit videos by the Modular Airborne FireFighting System aircraft are great. If you look VERY closely you will see two puffs of smoke from the lead plane, marking the beginning and end of the drop.