Video found of another engine failure on an MD87 air tanker

Chico, California, November 8, 2018

engine failure md87 air tanker chico california
Screengrab from the video of smoke coming from Tanker 107 as it was beginning to take off at Chico, California, November 8, 2018. Video by Robert Barnes.

Last week we received a video of an engine failing on an MD87 air tanker as it was taking off July 30, 2018 at Coeur D’Alene Airport in Idaho en route to drop retardant on a wildfire. The fact that the engine failed that day was well known, especially since hot debris falling from the aircraft started seven fires within a five-mile radius of the airport. One of the firefighters was injured while suppressing the fires.

This week another video has surfaced about an engine failure on an MD87 that received little or no publicity. Tanker 107 was just beginning its takeoff as Robert Barnes shot the video near his hangar at Chico Metropolitan Airport on the first day of the Camp Fire which burned into Paradise, California, November 8, 2018. The smoke in the background is from the Camp Fire.

Mr. Barnes said that after the incident a City of Chico truck hauled away large chunks of metal that looked to him like they came from a jet engine. He heard the Tower caution other air tankers to land long on Runway 31 due to F.O.D on the approach end.

This is the third engine failure on MD87 air tankers that we are aware of. On September 13, 2015 debris from an engine landed in a residential area of Fresno, California. One piece of metal crashed through the rear window of a car, while other shrapnel was found in city streets.

On July 30, 2018 an engine on an MD87 air tanker failed while taking off at Coeur D’Alene Airport in Idaho en route to drop retardant on a wildfire.

After the MD87 was first introduced as an air tanker, Erickson Aero Air made at least two modifications to the retardant delivery system in efforts to prevent retardant from entering the engines.

Former VP of Carson helicopters disputes restitution ordered for tragedy on Iron 44 Fire

Seven firefighters and two pilots were killed in the 2008 helicopter crash

(This article was first published at Wildfire Today)

The former Vice President of Carson Helicopters is disputing a court order to pay $51 million in restitution related to his role in falsifying documents prior to the crash of a helicopter on the Iron 44 Fire (or Iron Complex) on the Shasta-Trinity National Forest near Weaverville, California in 2008. Steve Metheny, the former Vice President of Carson Helicopters, was sentenced to 12 years and 7 months in prison in 2015 but now he claims he was not aware of the requirement to pay restitution.

Carson helicopter
Below is an excerpt from an article in the Mail Tribune:

[Metheny] says he wouldn’t have pleaded guilty had he known he’d have to pay a restitution of more than $51 million, according to documents filed earlier this month in U.S. District Court in Medford.

Metheny claims that his defense lawyer assured him that he wouldn’t have to pay any damages because by June 2013, Carson’s contract “was canceled and never re-bid” and “the resultant cost and subsequent loss would equal zero dollars,” according to an affidavit Metheny typed from Federal Correctional Institution Lompoc and filed in court May 7.

Metheny claims he was “repeatedly promised” ahead of his sentencing that the loss amount would be “zero dollars.”

Metheny was accused of falsifying performance charts and the weights of helicopters his company had under contract to the U.S. Forest Service for supporting wildland fire operations. As of a result of his fraud, a Carson helicopter crashed while trying to lift off with too much weight from a remote helispot on the Iron 44 Fire in 2008. Nine people were killed, including the pilot-in-command, a U.S. Forest Service check pilot, and seven firefighters. The copilot and three firefighters were seriously injured.

Mr. Metheny went to great lengths after the crash to attempt to conceal the fraud. When he knew that investigators would be examining the company’s operations, he directed other employees to remove weight from other similar helicopters, including taking off a fuel cell and replacing a very heavy battery with an empty shell of a battery. Some of the employees refused to participate in that deception, with one explaining that he was done lying about the helicopter’s weight.

Defense lawyer Steven Myers argued that the helicopter pilot could have avoided the crash by doing a standard maneuver on takeoff, where the pilot hovers and checks his gauges.

Ann Aiken, a federal judge for the United States District Court for the District of Oregon, dismissed that argument, noting her father had flown helicopters in the Korean War, crashing 13 times. “Whether the gauges were right or not, the pilot didn’t have the right information,” Aiken told Metheny.

The Forest Service awarded contracts to Carson, including option years, amounting to over $51,000,000. Carson received $18,831,891.12 prior to the FS canceling the contracts.

Levi Phillips, 45, the former maintenance chief of Carson Helicopters, agreed to cooperate with authorities in the case against Mr. Metheny and pleaded guilty to a single charge of fraud. He was sentenced to 25 months in prison to be followed by 3 years of supervised probation.

More information about the fraud and the sentencing hearing of Metheny and Phillips.

Thanks and a tip of the hat go out to Kelly. Typos or errors, report them HERE.

Tanker 134 begins CAL FIRE contract with new livery

During the Australian summer it was south of the equator fighting fires.

Tanker 134
Tanker 134 has started a new contract with CAL FIRE. Coulson photo.

When Air Tanker 134, a C-130Q, flew across the Pacific in October, 2018 to begin a firefighting contract in Australia, it had just completed its conversion into an air tanker. There was no time to pretty it up with a fancy paint job, it had work to do.

It has only been back in North America for a couple of months but its been busy with maintenance and getting new livery. It looks like it was painted white and then partially covered with a fancy wrap.

And it has already started its second contract, this time with CAL FIRE. In the last couple of days it as been spotted at Redding and Porterville.

The military has used C-130Q aircraft as a strategic communications link  for the U.S. Navy’s Fleet Ballistic Missile submarine force and as a backup communications link for the U. S. Air Force manned strategic bomber and intercontinental ballistic missile forces.

A C-130Q is similar to a C-130H, but the “Q” model was outfitted with a six-mile long trailing wire antenna for communicating with submarines and bombers.

Coulson's L-130Q
Coulson’s C-130Q which became Tanker 134. Coulson photo, April 2017.
air tanker 134 C-130Q
C-130Q that became T-134, on the way to a makeover May 2017. Coulson photo,
t-134 c-130Q
Air tanker 134. Coulson’s most recently converted C-130Q. This was the first live fire it dropped on, in Australia, around November 1 , 2018.
c-130q tanker 134
Tanker 134 and one of the company’s Chinooks. Coulson photo April 11, 2019.

Another Coulson aircraft, a 737, has departed Australia now that its contract has ended.

CAL FIRE’s Military Helicopter Managers training

It included underwater helicopter egress procedures

CAL FIRE's Military Helicopter Managers training

This weekend the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) and the California National Guard are conducting Military Helicopter Manager training in the Sutter Creek area southeast of Sacramento. This annual training is a cooperative effort between the agencies. It included underwater helicopter egress procedures. Photos by CAL FIRE.

CAL FIRE's Military Helicopter Managers training
CAL FIRE's Military Helicopter Managers training

CAL FIRE's Military Helicopter Managers training

CAL FIRE's Military Helicopter Managers training

Video of helicopters and an MD87 dropping on the Soledad Fire

The rarely see Tanker 107 was captured in photos.

MD87 Soledad Fire retardant drop
An MD87 makes a retardant drop on the Soledad Fire in Southern California. Screengrab from video below.

Austin Dave got some excellent video Tuesday of helicopters and an MD87 air tanker dropping on the Soledad Fire in Southern California between Santa Clarita and Palmdale. The MD87, Tanker 107, is under contract to the U.S. Forest Service and helicopters can be seen in the video from both LA County and LA City.

This is the first time we have posted a confirmed photo of Tanker 107, which can be seen in Stu Mundel’s tweet. Other MD87s we have photos of, are Tankers 101, 102, 103, and 105.

Ventura County is converting military Blackhawks into FIREHAWKS

FIREHAWK blackhawk Ventura County
Ventura County is converting military HH-60L Blackhawks into FIREHAWKS. VCSO photo, Capt. Romano Bassi.

Ventura County has purchased three military HH-60L Blackhawk helicopters and is in the process of converting them into FIREHAWKS that will be used for fighting wildland fires, personnel transport, search and rescue, law enforcement, and medical evacuation.

Ventura County Battalion Chief Gary Monday said heavy maintenance and minor modifications were completed on the aircraft at HSI Sikorsky in Huntsville, Alabama, then two of the helicopters were painted at the United Rotorcraft facility in Decatur, Texas. One of them is now being ferried to United Rotorcraft in Englewood, Colorado to receive navigation and communication systems, cabin interiors, and a 1,000 gallon external fixed water tank with a retractable snorkel system. The landing gear will be replaced with higher gear to enable the installation of the belly tank.

FIREHAWK blackhawk Ventura County
A Ventura County HH-60L Blackhawk before being painted and converted into a FIREHAWK. VCFD photo.

The military had the aircraft originally configured by United Rotorcraft as dedicated MEDEVAC helicopters with medical equipment and patient litter systems, some of which will be repurposed in the new FIREHAWK configuration.

Ventura County, in Southern California, has a joint Fire Department and Sheriff’s Department Aviation Unit. In addition to the FIREHAWKS, they have one Bell 206 Jet Ranger, one 212 HP, one 205B, and two UH-1A Hueys.

“We are a full service 24/7 operation capable of Night Vision Goggle rescues and firefighting”, Chief Monday said, “with three 375 simplex tanks for nighttime water dropping missions, S & R missions, LE missions, and anything else.”

FIREHAWK blackhawk Ventura County
Ventura County is converting military HH-60L Blackhawks into FIREHAWKS. VC FD photo.

In 2016 one of the Hueys, Copter 7, developed a mechanical problem while fighting the Pine Fire on the Los Padres National Forest. It had to be stripped down in order to transport it via truck on a route that included a tunnel with a height restriction.

Thanks and a tip of the hat go out to Gary and Isaac. Typos or errors, report them HERE.

Firefighting at Los Angeles International Airport

Los Angeles Fire Department airport rescue
Screen grab from LAFD video.

Airport firefighting is a very specialized niche —  there are not many similarities in what they do compared to most other firefighters. For example, one of the Los Angeles Fire Department’s rigs at the city’s airport can apply by the push of a button on the dash, water, foam, dry chemical, or Halotron (a clean agent). That truck also has a penetrator device which can pierce the fuselage of an aircraft in order to apply one of the four suppressing agents in the interior of the aircraft.

Los Angeles Fire Department airport rescue
A penetrating nozzle on a Los Angeles Fire Department airport rescue truck. Screen grab from LAFD video.

Much more information is in the video below about the Los Angeles Fire Department Airport Rescue Firefighting organization.

Lead plane pilot honored for working despite losing his home in fire

David Spliethof award lead plane
Lead Plane Pilot David Spliethof (2nd from left) receives award. Left to right: Deputy Regional Forester Barnie Gyant, Spliethof,  Acting DRF Edward Hunter,  Region 5 Aviation Officer Yolanda Saldana,  Acting DRF Larry Sutton,  Region 5 Fire Director Bob Baird,  Regional Forester Randy Moore. USFS photo by Paul Wade.

A U.S. Forest Service lead plane pilot whose home was destroyed in the Carr Fire near Redding, California earlier this year continued to work each day guiding large air tankers as they made their retardant drops on the fire. On December 12 David Spliethof received a 2018 Regional Forester’s Honor Award for the work he did on the fire. The award is given to those who went above and beyond their scope of duty to perform an act of service of rare or exceptional character that reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the well-being of others.

Mr. Spliethof continued to fly as a lead plane pilot for days after he knew he lost his home and all of his family’s belongings. The Spliefthof’s had nothing but the clothes on their backs. He said in an interview that there is no place he would rather be than flying and helping others instead of feeling sorry for himself. He had his family, so he continued to fly to minimize the loss of more homes. Several air tanker pilots stated that for a while they had no idea Mr. Spliefthof lost his home because he was professional and never missed a beat.

There is a critical shortage of lead plane pilots and he had every reason to forgo his duties and focus on his personal situation. However, he chose to serve the agency and the public.