Bell 412 lands in water after tail rotor strike while refilling water bucket

The tail rotor of a Bell 412 struck a tree while it was attempting to refill its water bucket February 26, 2019 in the northwest part of Spain. The firefighting helicopter (EC-MAQ) operated by Babcock settled upright in a couple of feet of water in the Narcea River in Belmonte de Miranda, Asturias (map).

Photos show damage to the tail rotor. There were no reported injuries.

Helicopter crashes into lake while fighting wildfire in Australia

The crew of three swam to shore

Christine 341 Air-Crane crash
File photo of Air-Crane 341, known as “Christine”. Photo taken in November, 2018 by Uniform Photography.

(UPDATED at 8:49 p.m. MT [USA] January 28, 2019)

9 News has an update on the crash of an Erickson Air-Crane in Victoria, Australia on January 28, 2019. Video shows the Air-Crane on its side with a portion of the tail boom and main landing gear protruding above the water. Also the white skimming tube is visible which can be lowered as the helicopter flies near the surface of a body of water, using the same principle to refill the tank as the Be-200, Fire Boss, and CL-215/415. Drafting or skimming with the Air-Crane takes 45 seconds. It is unlikely that the aircraft was skimming when the accident occurred due to the lack of sufficient space. The Air-Crane also has a snorkel or drafting hose that is more often used for refilling while hovering over water.

Below is an excerpt from an article at ABC News Australia that was updated Monday evening, US time:

Five similar Air-Cranes — in NSW, South Australia, Western Australia and Victoria — were grounded while the crash was investigated.

Kestrel Aviation managing director Ray Cronin, whose company manages the fleet, said the ground was a “precautionary measure” while the company interviewed the crew and determined a probable cause.

He said after an initial investigation, the company and authorities had agreed that the grounding of the Aircrane fleet would be lifted.

“The Aircranes will return to service almost immediately,” Mr Cronin said.

“The crews are with the aircraft ready to rejoin the fire fight in Victoria.”

He said while he did not want to pre-empt the outcome of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau’s (ATSB) investigation, he understood “the serviceability of the Aircrane” was good at the time of the crash.

Air-Crane crash Australia
Parts of the Air-Crane can be seen above the water in this screengrab from the 9 News video.
Air-Crane crash Australia helicopter
The Air-Crane crashed in a valley surrounded by rising terrain. Image from ABC Australia video. Arrow added by Fire Aviation.

(Originally published at 12:47 MT [USA] January 28, 2019)

A helicopter crashed into a lake while fighting a wildfire Monday in Victoria, Australia. The Erickson Air-Crane had a crew of three, two pilots and an engineer, while it was working on the Thomson Complex Catchment fires in Gippsland. The personnel are safe after swimming to shore. Ambulance Victoria will assess the crew members. Emergency Management Victoria said the helicopter was Air-Crane HT 341, known as “Christine”.

The aircraft was one of ten aircraft working on the fire. The site of the crash, in the Yarra Ranges National Park, is about 50km (31 miles) south of Benalla.

Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp said that he was grateful that the crew are safe.

The Flight Safety Foundation reports the helicopter is “damaged beyond repair”.

The two Air-Cranes under contract in Victoria can carry more than 2,500 gallons of water or retardant. The state also has 47 other aircraft on contract.

A total of six large fixed wing air tankers from North America have been working in Australia during their 2018-2019 summer.  Tankers with their primary base at Richmond, New South Wales include a RJ85, (Tanker 166); a  737 (T-137); a C-130Q (T-134); and another RJ85 (T-165). Based at Avalon in Victoria are a C-130Q (T-131); and an RJ85 (T-163).

The accident is being investigated by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau. The agency expects to complete their report during the third quarter of 2019.

Thanks and a tip of the hat go out to Doug and Tom. Typos or errors, report them HERE.

A look at the crash rescue kit

On December 18 the National Wildfire Coordinating group published a 4-minute video that gives a brief overview to the contents of the Crash Rescue Kit. It can be ordered like any other fire equipment through the fire cache system, as NFES #1040. If you desire to purchase it, the cost is $724.75.

The video implies it would be appropriate to have the kit available at an incident helibase.

Helicopter crashes, starts fire, rescuers burned over

helicopter crash site
An overview of the crash site and the extraction point for the three victims. Photo from the report.

A report has been released for a helicopter crash in a very remote area of Nevada that started a fire, injured two passengers, and resulted in rescuers being burned over. It happened August 18, 2018 about 10 miles north of Battle Mountain.

One of the passengers called 911 on a cell phone at 1357:

We just got into a helicopter crash…three occupants, all of us are alive and managed to get out…started a big fire, fire is burning all around us right now…one of the guys hit his head pretty hard…you’re gonna have to get a helicopter, it’s the only way to get in here.

Adding to the complexity was the fact that several different agencies and organizations had various responsibilities: Lander County Dispatch, Battle Mountain Volunteer Fire Department, local EMS services, a medical helicopter, Elko Interagency Dispatch Center, and Central Nevada Interagency Dispatch Center.

As might be expected the complex communication chain between the victims and the actual emergency responders created some difficulties, including a delay in extracting the three personnel.

The Facilitated Learning Analysis does not speculate what caused the crash of the helicopter that was transporting two biologists on a chukar survey, but it started a fire, which was named Sheep Creek. The biologists and the pilot self-extracted, one of them with what appeared to be a serious head injury, and they all hiked up a steep slope to a flat bench where they awaited a helicopter. About two hours after the 911 call the three were evacuated from the scene by a firefighting helicopter that was on scene, and possibly also a medical helicopter. The report is not clear about this.

helicopter crash site
A closer view of the crash site. Photo from the report.

Meanwhile a volunteer fire department Type 4 engine that had responded in a search and rescue mode toward the crash site found that the condition of the road they were traveling on deteriorated from a 2-track road to a 4×4 trail, and finally ended. At that point the fire was closing in on their location. The rookie firefighter and the Fire Chief got out, and leaving their wildland fire personal protective gear in the truck, began to spray water around the vehicle.

From the report:

Within seconds, the fire was all around Pumper- 2. Both individuals were caught outside of the vehicle while trying to spray water. Neither had on their personal protective equipment (PPE) when the burnover occurred. The Chief stated, “We were in a rescue mission, so we had no PPE on.”

During the burnover, the firefighter jumped off the back of Pumper-2, started to run around the vehicle and then took refuge under Pumper-2. “I was burning and screaming and hunkered down underneath behind the rear tires.” After the burnover, the Chief yelled for the firefighter, whom he could not see anywhere. He eventually located the firefighter under Pumper-2.

After sustaining significant burns, both the Chief and firefighter got back into the vehicle, with the Chief driving, continuing down drainage. The fire was behind them as they continued driving through the black towards the bottom of the drainage. Pumper-2 drove through the bottom of the drainage over the rough terrain until getting stuck. Both individuals got out of the vehicle and proceeded to hike up the steep ridge until they got on top of the ridge to establish communications.

At 1646, Lander County Dispatch received a 911 call from the firefighter, who said he and the Chief had been burned. “We need help.” Dispatch was asking questions to establish a location, but the cell phone was breaking up. The firefighter said, “We might need a helicopter because we are on the ridge…in the black…wearing a red shirt and just uphill right of the engine.”

Suppression resources were actively engaged on the wildland fire during the burnover of the Pumper-2. The Incident Commander of the wildland fire was unaware that Pumper-2 was on the fire until well after the burnover occurred. The dispatch centers did not know the location of Pumper-2.

At 1745 the injured firefighters were located and extracted by the air medical and suppression helicopters to awaiting ground medical resources at Battle Mountain Airport. At about 1900, fixed-wing aircraft flew the injured firefighters to the University of Utah Burn Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The FLA points out a number of organizational and human issues that are worthy of consideration. One topic that was not thoroughly addressed in the report was the dispatchers and firefighting personnel at times did not know the exact location of the crash site or the victims, and were not aware that the engine was responding or it’s location following the injuries to the two firefighters.

Even when, eventually, the location of emergency responders will be able to be tracked on an incident, biologists and volunteer firefighters will probably be some of the last personnel to employ this capability on a routine basis.

A few more details available about the helicopter accident at Donnell Fire in California

A company representative described it as a forced landing

The pilot walked away from what is now being described as a forced landing of the helicopter that went down August 25 while on a water-dropping mission on the Donnell Fire on the Stanislaus National Forest in California. After walking some distance from the accident site and being treated on-scene by paramedics the pilot was admitted to a hospital for observation overnight. He is expected to make a full recovery.

Ian Gregor, communications manager with the Federal Aviation Administration, said on Monday that the helicopter “crashed and rolled” at the accident site.

According to an August 27 article in the Union Democrat, Kevin Shields, a representative of Roberts Aircraft, said their Bell 212 had a forced landing due to “some unknown event that was occurring with the aircraft.”

Bell 212 Kachina
File photo of a Bell 212 operated by Kachina Aviation, taken by Akradecki March 16, 2007.

Helicopter crashes at helispot on Donnell Fire in California

The pilot walked away with minor injuries

A helicopter crashed at a helispot while working on the Donnell Fire in Northern California yesterday, August 25. Chris Fogle, the Incident Commander of the Incident Management Team running the fire said the pilot walked away with minor injuries which were treated on-site by paramedics.

The helicopter was described as a medium ship that was on a water dropping mission.  The pilot’s name has not been released but the family has been notified. The only location given was that it occurred “on the southwest fire perimeter within the containment zone”.

Since the Donnell Fire started on August 1 it has burned 35,000 acres in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the Stanislaus National Forest 34 air miles south of Lake Tahoe. Most of the fire that is still active is 7,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level.

The fire is a “less than full suppression fire” and Sunday morning had seven helicopters assigned. It has destroyed 135 structures.

helicopter water drop Donnell Fire
A screenshot captured from a video on InciWeb, showing a helicopter (unknown which one) on a water dropping mission on the Donnell Fire at Eagle Creek. It was posted to InciWeb August 16, 2018.

SEAT makes hard landing while fighting wildfire in Washington

Pilot self-extricates, was transported hospital

On August 14 a Single Engine Air Tanker made a forced hard landing while working on the Horns Mountain Fire in Northern Washington. The pilot was transported to a hospital.

Air Spray USA, Inc, the company that owns the aircraft, stated:

The aircraft experienced an unknown problem on the fire it was working near the US/Canadian border. The pilot executed a forced landing on a logging road and was able to exit the aircraft. He was transported to the hospital. No other information is available at this time. An investigation is in process.

Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz said on Twitter that the pilot is OK and receiving medical attention.

KXLY reported that the Department of Natural Resources told them the pilot survived the crash and was able to crawl to a nearby road to get help.

The aircraft was one of five amphibious FireBoss air tankers assigned to the fire Tuesday.

map Horns Mountain Fire
Map showing the location of the Horns Mountain Fire.

The lightning-caused fire has burned 832 acres in Washington southeast of Christina Lake, BC since it started August 11.

Thanks and a tip of the hat go out to Robert.
Typos or errors, report them HERE.

One injured in CAL FIRE CWN helicopter hard landing

helicopter crash Oakdale California
CWN helicopter crashes while en route to Weed, CA. Photo Courtesy of Stanislaus Consolidated Fire Protection District via Twitter.

A helicopter under a Call When Needed contract with CAL FIRE experienced a hard landing July 24 while ferrying from Southern California to Weed where it was needed to assist with a fire. According to Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Sgt. Frank Soria, the
helicopter began experiencing problems while enroute. As the pilot turned toward the Oakdale Airport the aircraft crashed.

Sgt. Soria said the pilot refused medical treatment but a passenger was admitted to a hospital.

Thanks and a tip of the hat go out to Al.
Typos or errors, report them HERE.